HEALTH RISK OF ZINC POLLUTANT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL IN SOME LEAVES OF SELECTED LEAFY VEGETABLES IN KIRKUK, NORTH IRAQ

  • Hassan A.A. Al-Jumaily Department of Applied Geology, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Iraq
  • Eman Waleed Al-Berzanje Department of Applied Geology, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Iraq
Keywords: Zinc, Transfer factor, Leafy vegetable, Pollution level, Health risk assessment

Abstract

Evaluation of the environmental geochemistry needs studying element content in different environmental profiles, for that reason the zinc content has been studied in the soil-plant to fill gaps in Kirkuk City. Ten soil samples (L1–L10) are collected from agricultural fields (0–20 cm depth), with twelve leafy vegetable samples for four types, and each type has three samples: celery (N1, N2, N3), basil (N4, N5, N6), cress (N7, N8, N9), and arugula (N10, N11, N12) from the fields (L2, L7, L8) which the soil sample were chosen. Samples were analyzed using ICP-MS technique. The results show the average concentration value of Zn in soil samples is 70.91 mg/kg the highest concentration is recorded in sample L7 (169.2 mg/kg), whereas in the plant samples the highest average of Zn was found in cress 67.73> basil 52.53> arugula 38.9> celery 29.3 in mg/kg, respectively. Transfer factor value showed that the highest value in Cress 0.729> TF Basil 0.612> TF Arugula 0.511> TF Celery 0.395, respectively. Igeo result values show that all soil sampling sites are unpolluted with Zn, except L7 is unpolluted to moderate with Igeo value (0.8). The contamination factor values in L7, L8, L9, L10 samples (2.603, 1.284, 1.086 and 1.129) refers to a moderate contamination level with Zn. Target hazard quotient values for children >1 in samples N4, N5, N7, N8, N9, N10, and target hazard quotient values for adult >1 in samples N5, N8, N9, that indicate they are exposed to different health effects. The increase in the concentration of the Zn in soils is due to irrigated field crops with wastewater, and through it, the plant absorbs it by root depending on the type of plant, the location of the sample, and the soil properties.       

Published
2020-10-28